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The Internet is Written in Ink

kevin-roper-hits-tracy-morgan-18-wheeler-300x170Many people are constantly online updating others to their lives on social media such as Facebook and Twitter. Although it has become common practice to use these social sites, many of us do not realize how what we say online can hurt us in the future.

Over the weekend, star comedian and SNL alumna Tracy Morgan was involved in a fatal crash when the limo bus he was in was allegedly rear-ended by a Walmart tractor-trailer. The crash left one person dead and two in serious condition, including comedian Tracy Morgan. Media sources say Kevin Roper, the driver of the tractor-trailer that hit Morgan’s vehicle, has admitted he may have fallen asleep at the wheel, but his Twitter bio may tell a different story.

Social Media Posts Can Hurt You In Court

When prosecutors looked to Roper’s Twitter, his bio reportedly included a frightening message. “Trying to win more than lose! Driving trucks for a living it’s my road move or get hit!” Although the driver’s current bio has eliminated the threat, it did not stop prosecutors from seeing his motto, “it’s my road move or get hit.” After Saturday’s accident, Roper could learn that what he says online may not always stay online.

In many cases these days, people forget that it is legal for both sides to take evidence from their public social accounts. Since these sites are legally public domain, anything written, posted or said on them has the potential to come back up to hurt you in court. No matter the circumstances when writing a post, if it is incriminating in any way, attorneys could find a way to use it against you.

Keep yourself safe in your current and future legal issues by thinking before you tweet. In a court of law, you have the right to remain silent, and more often than not, you should.

Photo Credit: TMZ.com

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