What You Need To Know About The Claim Linking Baby Powder To Ovarian Cancer

Johnson & Johnson, the company that makes the leading baby powder containing talcum, has been in the news lately for an alarming reason: Several lawsuits have been brought forward, claiming decades-long use of the product has contributed to ovarian cancer in thousands of women.

Yesterday, October 27, a St. Louis jury awarded a California woman more than $70 million in her lawsuit.

The jury ruling ended the trial that began Sept. 26 in the case brought by Deborah Giannecchini of Modesto, California. She was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2012. The suit accused Johnson & Johnson of "negligent conduct" in making and marketing its baby powder.

"We are pleased the jury did the right thing. They once again reaffirmed the need for Johnson & Johnson to warn the public of the ovarian cancer risk associated with its product," Jim Onder, an attorney for the plaintiff, told The Associated Press.

While Giannecchini’s jury found enough evidence to decide that Johnson & Johnson misled the public by keeping the link between ovarian cancer and talcum powder hidden, scientific experts aren’t sure the link is meaningful. 

There are a lot of questions about the claim linking baby powder to ovarian cancer - so what should you believe? 

The Claim: Talcum powder contains a cancer-linked mineral

Flase. Talc, a natural mineral comprised of magnesium, silicon and oxygen, is often used in powders meant to absorb moisture and reduce friction. In its purest form, talc can also contain the mineral asbestos, which is associated with lung cancer when its fibers are inhaled over an extremely long period of time. But that doesn’t mean there is a relationship between talcum and other various cancer. And in any case, all talcum products on U.S. shelves have been asbestos-free since the 1970s. 

What the Experts Say

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) is part of the World Health Organization (WHO). Its major goal is to identify causes of cancer.
  • IARC classifies talc that contains asbestos as “carcinogenic to humans.”
  • Based on the lack of data from human studies and on limited data in lab animal studies, IARC classifies inhaled talc not containing asbestos as “not classifiable as to carcinogenicity in humans.”
  • Based on limited evidence from human studies of a link to ovarian cancer, IARC classifies the perineal (genital) use of talc-based body powder as “possibly carcinogenic to humans.”
If you or a loved one have used talc or talcum powder, and have suffered from the severe complications described above, you may be entitled to compensation. 

Contact the dangerous drug attorneys at Reyes Browne Reilley Law Firm today for a free, confidential legal consultation to learn more about your options. 

Why today?  Every state has maximum time limitations on when a claim must be filed (statutes of limitations). If a claim is not filed against the manufacturer within that time, the injured persons are forever prevented from bringing a claim against the companies who may have caused their injuries. 

Time is of the essence. Please submit the short form on this page or call us at 214-431-5652 today.