Articles Posted in Dangerous Behavior

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Fake Uber Driver Murders South Carolina College Girl - Reyes Browne ReilleyTragic news this past weekend shattered the hearts of two South Carolina parents when they received the news that all parents fear — their daughter has been found dead.

University of South Carolina student Samantha Josephson, 21, was leaving the bars Friday night in what she thought was her safe Uber ride home. About 14 hours later, her body was found more than 65 miles away in the woods of South Carolina. Surveillance cameras captured footage of Josephson getting into a black Chevy Impala. That was the last time she was seen alive. The owner of the vehicle, Nathaniel David Rowland, has been arrested and will be charged with kidnapping and murder.

However, this is not the first time this ride-share mistake has happened. One NBC reporter shares the story of another victim who was physically and sexually assaulted by an imposter Uber driver, and shows just how easy it is to fool unsuspecting ride-share customers:

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Nevada Considering 'Textalyzer' Cellphone Scan Technology For Police Use - Reyes Browne ReilleyAlthough texting while driving is already banned in many states, one state is considering taking this safety measure to the next level. Nevada could potentially pass a legislation which would grant law enforcement officers the ability to search through drivers’ cell phone usage history after a car crash.

Known as the “Textalyzer,” this new device works by connecting to the device and analyzing recent activity, such as opening social media apps like Facebook messenger. The Textalyzer was developed by the Israeli company Cellebrite.

“When I was growing up, drunk driving was a joke. Now it’s not a joke. Device use is a joke. Make it so it’s not funny.”  — Ben Lieberman, father of 19-year-old who was killed by a texting driver

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Record Breaking — Highest Pedestrian Death Count in Almost 30 Years - Reyes Browne Reilley
2018 brought the highest count of U.S. pedestrian deaths in nearly 30 years — since 1988. According to data from the Governors Highway Safety Association, there were an estimated 6,227 pedestrians deaths last year.

Transportation Safety Experts are attributing this rise in fatalities to the modern trend of optimizing highway construction to raise the maximum speed of commuting vehicles. Another factor is the shift in the types of vehicles on the road. Sedans and passenger cars are being replaced with trucks and SUVs, according to the GHSA study. These types of vehicles are heavier than smaller vehicles, and can cause more injury to pedestrians while driving at the same speed.

                “We’re killing way too many pedestrians. This has got to be a high priority,”                                    —Jonathan Adkins, executive director of GHSA

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Utah Lowers Legal BAC to 0.05 to Reduce DUIs - Reyes Browne Reilley
While drunk driving accidents have been on the decline over the past three decades, many states across the country are starting to strengthening their regulations in the hopes of preventing the reported 11,000 people killed in such accidents nationwide.

Last December, Utah lowered their legal driving blood alcohol content limit to 0.05% in hopes of decreasing the amount of D.U.I arrests. At an average of 30 D.U.I arrests/day, Utah already holds the record for the lowest number of daily D.U.I. arrests across the country. Already recognized as the most heavily restricted state for alcohol distribution/consumption, this new legislation has angered many, including those from the American Beverage Institute, a trade group that is working with bars and restaurants against the new law. “Someone with a 0.05% blood alcohol level is not meaningfully impaired,” says the managing director, Sarah Longwall.

In contrast to Utah, Texas’ statistics are much more distressing — every 20 minutes a Texan is hurt or killed in an alcohol-related crash.

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For the third year in a row, there have been more than 40,000 traffic deaths throughout the United States. Although this number is startlingly high, there has been a slight downward trend over the past two years.

In 2017, the traffic death toll of 40,231 decreased by slightly less than 1% compared to 2016’s count of 40,327. The National Safety Council reports that 2018 is down another 1% with an estimated 40,000 traffic fatalities.

Annual Motor Vehicle Fatality Estimates - NSC
According to The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, traffic deaths began dropping in 2008 and reached their lowest point in six decades in 2011 at 32,000. Experts suggest that this low point was a result of the recession, and as the economy started to bounce back, so did the number of cars on the road. Not only were American adults driving more, but so were the unexperienced teens. Additionally, more people were engaging in riskier behavior such as going out on weekends and taking lengthier road trips to new places.

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Bird Box Challenge Gone Wrong - Reyes Browne ReilleyEveryone is talking about the latest Netflix original movie, Bird Box. (For those who have not seen it yet, don’t worry, we won’t release any spoilers.) In the film, the characters must navigate through the world while remaining blindfolded. The internet took this idea and ran with it, thus giving birth to “The Bird Box Challenge.” This meme is centered around performing everyday tasks all the while, you guessed it, remaining blindfolded. Unfortunately, one risky individual took this challenge to the streets.

Last week, a 17-year-old girl from Layton, Utah decided to try this challenge while driving. According to Layton police officer Lt. Travis Lyman, the young driver pulled her hat over her eyes to replicate the blindfold used in the movie. She then drifted into oncoming traffic where she hit another car. Thankfully, no one was injured in the crash.

One of the first things every driver should learn is to keep your eyes on the road. By throwing common sense to the wayside for the sake of “going viral,” she put herself, as well as everyone around her, at risk. Earning likes, comments, or shares should never threaten another person’s life. After this incident was made public, Netflix turned to Twitter with a message to their viewers:

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The Greatest Risk For Teenage Drivers? Lack of Experience
Adolescents are known to take chances, succumb to peer pressure, overestimate their abilities, and have emotional mood swings. Each of these behaviors can increase the likelihood for the teenage driver to be involved in an automobile crash. Investigations have shown that “the cause of teenage crashes is not the skill with which they can drive, but the judgment they exercise while driving,” according to an editorial in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Dr. Simons-Morton of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development has concluded from research that “safe driving judgment, as with all complex activities, comes only with experience.”

Inexperienced drivers are left with a Catch-22: Lack of experience makes puts them at high risk of being involved in an accident, and the only way to improve as a driver is more experience. One of the safest methods to increase experience for new teen drivers is supervised driving sessions with their parents, before and after they have obtained their license. This provides a real-time, constructive environment in which to get hands-on experience, all while being monitored by their parents, legal guardian, or other knowledgable driver with years of experience under their belt. By continuing supervised driving practice sessions, this can help mitigate risks for your children and loved ones.

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For most counties in Texas, students went back to school in August. Teachers, parents, and kids of all ages likely geared up for the summer to fall transition for weeks.

Returning to school not only means getting back in the classroom, but also the return to playgrounds, gymnasiums, forms of travel, and sports. While recess and extracurricular activities are often referred to as the “fun” part of school for many, they are also the setting for the potential of numerous accidents and injuries.

According to research conducted by the National SAFE KIDS Campaign (NSKC), an estimated 2.2 million children ages 14 and younger sustain school related injuries each year.

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shutterstock_909878241-300x199Statistics show that teens are among the most dangerous drivers. This is not news to any of us. Many teens are just irresponsible, while others simply don’t have the experience necessary to be good drivers. The fact is that drivers between the ages of 16 and 19 are the most dangerous drivers. According to the National Traffic Safety Administration, for each mile driven, teen drivers are approximately four times fore likely to be involved in an accident with another driver. They’re also involved in four times more fatal accidents than drivers between the ages of 25 and 69. Teens account for about ten percent of the population, and twelve percent of all fatal car wrecks.

So given these statistics, the question becomes, “Who is liable for these driving mistakes – the teen, the owner of the vehicle or the teen’s parents?” The following are some situations to consider when answering that question.

A Teen Crashes a Family Vehicle

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180830185511-01-new-mexico-bus-crash-super-tease-300x169UPDATE – Authorities on Saturday identified five of the eight people who died in this week’s crash involving a Greyhound bus and a semitrailer on Interstate 40 in New Mexico.

The victims were identified as Sadie Thomas, 50; Charla Bahe, 34; Terry Mason, 45; Luis Alvarez, 50; and Veronica Jean Williams, 49, the Office of the Medical Investigator in New Mexico announced in a news release. Alvarez was the bus driver.

At least eight people were killed and more than 40 injured after a semi-truck and Greyhound bus collided on a busy New Mexico highway Thursday. One survivor, Rachel Cunningham, who said she was asleep on the Greyhound when the crash happened, woke up to a gaping hole in the bus’ passenger side.

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