Articles Posted in Dangerous Behavior

Published on:

bigstock-214125700-300x200Everyone knows the dangers of driving while under the influence of alcohol, but many people aren’t aware of risks of drowsy driving. Considering that nearly 328,000 car accidents can be linked to drowsy driving each year, it’s time to take a closer look at this growing problem and take action.

The Sleep-Deprived Brain

When the heavy blinks and frequent yawns start, most people push through the fatigue in favor of getting to their destination on time. As you begin to understand what happens to your brain when you’re tired, you might reconsider.

Published on:

shutterstock_909878241-300x199Statistics show that teens are among the most dangerous drivers. This is not news to any of us. Many teens are just irresponsible, while others simply don’t have the experience necessary to be good drivers. The fact is that drivers between the ages of 16 and 19 are the most dangerous drivers. According to the National Traffic Safety Administration, for each mile driven, teen drivers are approximately four times fore likely to be involved in an accident with another driver. They’re also involved in four times more fatal accidents than drivers between the ages of 25 and 69. Teens account for about ten percent of the population, and twelve percent of all fatal car wrecks.

So given these statistics, the question becomes, “Who is liable for these driving mistakes – the teen, the owner of the vehicle or the teen’s parents?” The following are some situations to consider when answering that question.

A Teen Crashes a Family Vehicle

Published on:

bigstock-Drinking-Driving-209079-1024x683The holiday season can be a very joyous time of the year. Family members and friends routinely use this time to eat, drink, and fellowship.

Unfortunately, with it comes the potential to celebrate a little too much.

If you, or someone you know, is in a situation where they have been drinking and need a ride home there are a number of options available. It should be top priority to avoid getting behind the wheel after you have been drinking. This could result in some serious consequences.

Published on:

bigstock-180327130-1024x684There are a lot of things to dislike about daylight saving time: the disruption in our sleep schedule, the onslaught of seasonal puns in retail advertisements, the fact that it doesn’t work as well at saving energy as we’ve always been told, and thus, it really serves no purpose.

But have you ever thought about the possibility that daylight saving time might actually be dangerous? Turning the clocks back should technically amount to an extra hour of sleep, but this is not necessarily true. When the clocks change, whether it is falling back or springing forward, studies have found people’s sleep cycles are interrupted which actually causes them to sleep less. One hour of sleep lost or gained may sound like a small change, but studies have shown it can have major effects on both our physical and mental health. In turn, these negative health effects set off a chain reaction that affects other aspects of our life. According to a study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, people who sleep six to seven hours a night are twice as likely to be involved in a vehicle accident as those who sleep eight hours or more; people sleeping less than 5 hours increased their risk to be involved in a vehicle accident four to five times more.

Researchers at the University of Colorado at Boulder studied the daylight saving time period (from March to November) for 10 years and discovered there was a 17 percent increase in traffic incident-related deaths the Monday after the spring time change. Traffic fatalities all that week were also higher than average. Some of the effects can be attributed to lower visibility (the fact that it’s earlier, and therefore darker, than drivers are accustomed to), but most of the accidents, experts say, are because people are struggling to stay awake behind the wheel.

Published on:

bigstock-Halloween-pumpkin-head-jack-la-208070650-300x203Halloween is an amazing and fun time of year. Decorations go up, haunted houses advertise spooky thrills, and thousands of trick-or-treaters around the Dallas Metroplex go out in search of a sugar coma.

However, with all the extra activities and people visiting your property, safety hazards can result in serious injuries. If you, as the homeowner, are aware of a hazard on your property that might not be obvious to everyone else and they get hurt, you could be liable. It is important to take necessary precautions when preparing for Halloween to help everyone stay safe and enjoy an accident-free holiday.

How can you increase everyone’s safety during Halloween?

Published on:

bigstock-207983101-1-300x200

Since 1990, when the annual number of vehicular heatstroke victims was first recorded, more than 800 children have died in hot parked cars.

Many of these deaths occurred because parents forgot that the children were in the car. And while automakers offer technology that steers a vehicle or alerts drivers to a car in the next lane, they have not released technology to tell drivers when they are forgetting a child in the back seat.

But congressional lawmakers are now weighing whether to require new cars to include a device for detecting children in the back seat and warning the driver of their presence after the car has been turned off. The requirements were attached to a House bill, passed last month, that is meant to speed the development of self-driving vehicles. The Senate version of the bill, which cleared a committee vote this month, includes an amendment with the warning requirement.

Published on:

https://www.reyeslaw.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Screen-Shot-2017-09-28-at-5.21.25-PM.png

A Pennsylvania mother shook by a car crash that could have taken her boys lives on Monday is telling parents: Buckle up your kids. Every time.

A photo Jenna Casado Rabberman shared on Facebookshows a mangled 2015 Honda CRV with seemingly pristine carseats sitting outside. Those carseats, Chicco and Graco models, protected Rabberman’s 6-week-old and 3-year-old, she said.

“This is why you buckle your kids into their car seats correctly every single time,” Rabberman said in a Facebook post. “Even when they scream because the straps are tight. Even when they complain about the chest clip or being rear facing.”

Published on:

AdobeStock_87284095-288x243
For most counties in Texas, students went back to school in August. Teachers, parents, and kids of all ages likely geared up for the summer to fall transition for weeks.

Returning to school not only means getting back in the classroom, but also the return to playgrounds, gymnasiums, forms of travel, and sports. While recess and extracurricular activities are often referred to as the “fun” part of school for many, they are also the setting for the potential of numerous accidents and injuries.

According to research conducted by the National SAFE KIDS Campaign (NSKC), an estimated 2.2 million children ages 14 and younger sustain school related injuries each year.

Published on:

Ctrl-300x200There are many measures to determine car safety, and one is to examine driver death rates per vehicle. Data from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety released in May identified the most dangerous cars on the road based on this measure.

Most of the models that have the highest driver fatality rates are small cars with structures that are less able to absorb the brunt of crashes. All of the cars with the lowest driver death rates were either large luxury cars or SUVs.

According to IIHS, 4-door minicars have the worst death rate at 87 per 1 million registered vehicles, while 4-wheel drive large luxury SUVs have the lowest with six driver deaths per 1 million registered vehicles.

Published on:

Sheltered-bigstock-Fireworks-lit-with-flame-of-ma-26408282-300x201The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission staff’s analysis of data on nonoccupational, fireworks-related deaths and injuries has shown deaths and injuries occur through the season as late as July 22.

As many of us have fireworks left over from the festivities, it is important to remain safe.

Firework Injury Prevention

Contact Information