Articles Posted in Dangerous Behavior

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The Greatest Risk For Teenage Drivers? Lack of Experience
Adolescents are known to take chances, succumb to peer pressure, overestimate their abilities, and have emotional mood swings. Each of these behaviors can increase the likelihood for the teenage driver to be involved in an automobile crash. Investigations have shown that “the cause of teenage crashes is not the skill with which they can drive, but the judgment they exercise while driving,” according to an editorial in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Dr. Simons-Morton of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development has concluded from research that “safe driving judgment, as with all complex activities, comes only with experience.”

Inexperienced drivers are left with a Catch-22: Lack of experience makes puts them at high risk of being involved in an accident, and the only way to improve as a driver is more experience. One of the safest methods to increase experience for new teen drivers is supervised driving sessions with their parents, before and after they have obtained their license. This provides a real-time, constructive environment in which to get hands-on experience, all while being monitored by their parents, legal guardian, or other knowledgable driver with years of experience under their belt. By continuing supervised driving practice sessions, this can help mitigate risks for your children and loved ones.

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For most counties in Texas, students went back to school in August. Teachers, parents, and kids of all ages likely geared up for the summer to fall transition for weeks.

Returning to school not only means getting back in the classroom, but also the return to playgrounds, gymnasiums, forms of travel, and sports. While recess and extracurricular activities are often referred to as the “fun” part of school for many, they are also the setting for the potential of numerous accidents and injuries.

According to research conducted by the National SAFE KIDS Campaign (NSKC), an estimated 2.2 million children ages 14 and younger sustain school related injuries each year.

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shutterstock_909878241-300x199Statistics show that teens are among the most dangerous drivers. This is not news to any of us. Many teens are just irresponsible, while others simply don’t have the experience necessary to be good drivers. The fact is that drivers between the ages of 16 and 19 are the most dangerous drivers. According to the National Traffic Safety Administration, for each mile driven, teen drivers are approximately four times fore likely to be involved in an accident with another driver. They’re also involved in four times more fatal accidents than drivers between the ages of 25 and 69. Teens account for about ten percent of the population, and twelve percent of all fatal car wrecks.

So given these statistics, the question becomes, “Who is liable for these driving mistakes – the teen, the owner of the vehicle or the teen’s parents?” The following are some situations to consider when answering that question.

A Teen Crashes a Family Vehicle

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180830185511-01-new-mexico-bus-crash-super-tease-300x169UPDATE – Authorities on Saturday identified five of the eight people who died in this week’s crash involving a Greyhound bus and a semitrailer on Interstate 40 in New Mexico.

The victims were identified as Sadie Thomas, 50; Charla Bahe, 34; Terry Mason, 45; Luis Alvarez, 50; and Veronica Jean Williams, 49, the Office of the Medical Investigator in New Mexico announced in a news release. Alvarez was the bus driver.

At least eight people were killed and more than 40 injured after a semi-truck and Greyhound bus collided on a busy New Mexico highway Thursday. One survivor, Rachel Cunningham, who said she was asleep on the Greyhound when the crash happened, woke up to a gaping hole in the bus’ passenger side.

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Ctrl-300x200There are many measures to determine car safety, and one is to examine driver death rates per vehicle. Data from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety released in May identified the most dangerous cars on the road based on this measure.

Most of the models that have the highest driver fatality rates are small cars with structures that are less able to absorb the brunt of crashes. All of the cars with the lowest driver death rates were either large luxury cars or SUVs.

According to IIHS, 4-door minicars have the worst death rate at 87 per 1 million registered vehicles, while 4-wheel drive large luxury SUVs have the lowest with six driver deaths per 1 million registered vehicles.

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Sheltered-bigstock-Fireworks-lit-with-flame-of-ma-26408282-300x201The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission staff’s analysis of data on nonoccupational, fireworks-related deaths and injuries has shown deaths and injuries occur through the season as late as July 22.

As many of us are getting ready for firework festivities, it is important to remain safe.

Firework Injury Prevention

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Deadly Dentistry - Part 6 - Could Dental Malpractice be Considered Murder?

A California dentist, Dr. Claire, was charged with second-degree murder in the death of his son, after performing a routine dental procedure. Patrick Claire, a developmentally disabled 36-year-old whose condition resembled autism, died shortly after having a painful wisdom tooth extracted by his father. Patrick died from respiratory failure and cardiac arrest as a result of an overdose of the sedatives morphine and valium. The dentist had been practicing for forty years and had a history of complaints filed against him for sedation-related issues. Morphine is not an approved sedative and Dr. Claire did not have a license to practice aesthetics.

What elevated the incident of death from dental malpractice to suspicion of murder was the testimony of an eyewitness to the entire procedure. Sandra Montoya was the dental assistant at the time and claimed that Dr. Claire did nothing when she tried to alert him that his son was struggling to breathe. She said that the doctor claimed that such was common and his son was prone to having seizures. After Ms. Montoya left work at 5:00 pm the doctor waited an hour and called 911. When police and rescue workers arrived around 6:00 pm they found Dr. Claire half-heartedly administering CPR to his son with a force the equivalent of “honking a car horn with one hand”. Patrick was taken to a local hospital where he was declared dead. Montoya told police that she did not see the doctor administer the required blood pressure tests to Patrick prior to giving him the sedatives and that there were no vital signs monitored during the procedure as required by law.

Although Dr. Claire claimed that he had given Patrick a standard intravenous dosage of valium and morphine, lethal amounts nearly three times the required level to sedate a patient of his height and weight were found in his system including some in his stomach. It was discovered that Patrick had sought medical attention at the local emergency room and was given pain prescription painkillers including novocaine. It is suspected that Patrick, a known local drug user, could have secured the morphine illegally and used it to relieve his pain without telling his father.

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car-wreck-dangers-dallas-300x200A car accident is a traumatizing experience that can lead to serious injuries and well as long-term emotional troubles. Here are six things that might shock you about car accidents.

1. Thirty-One Percent of Fatal Accidents Involve Alcohol

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), in 2017, 31 percent of all traffic-related fatalities in the U.S. involved an alcohol-impaired driver. There were 10,322 fatalities in the U.S. that involved a driver with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 or higher.

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texting-drivingTexting while driving now kills more teenagers than driving while intoxicated. Over 10,000 teens died in 2017 while they tried to send a text message when they were behind the wheel of a car. Approximately 2,700 teenagers died as the result of driving while intoxicated.

The Centers for Disease Control recently conducted a study, in which almost half of teenagers admitted to texting while driving.

Teens who admitted to sending and receiving text messages while behind the wheel also reported engaging in other risky behaviors as well. This includes driving under the influence of alcohol. Teenagers who texted while driving were five times more likely than others to drive after drinking. Young people engaging in the risky behavior were also found to be more likely to not wear seat belts.

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shutterstock_1245274481-300x200In order to begin to comprehend the issues surrounding distracted driving, it’s important to get a view of the bigger picture. Consider this about texting and driving:

In 2011, 23 percent of all car accidents reported were attributed to the driver using a cell phone in some capacity – talking, texting and driving, browsing, and even playing games – this number has increased to 54 percent in 2017.

Last year, 3,500 people died in car accidents that are attributable to distracted drivers, including texting and driving. This doesn’t necessarily relate to the use of cell phones, but encompasses all driver distractions.

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