Articles Posted in Distracted Driving

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Car Accident Lawyers RBR Law - Car Accident Fatalities Drop Significantly in 2017 and 2018
According to The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, traffic casualties fell by 1.8% for all of 2017. This came as a welcome relief after the sharp rise in deaths in the past several years. The National Safety Council states that from 2014 to 2015, traffic fatalities rose 7%, which marked the steepest two-year increase in over 50 years. 2016 brought an additional increase of 7%.

These new reduced statistics could be attributed to a variety of factors, one of which is automobile technology. Vehicle manufacturers are making cars safer than ever before by adding more crash avoidance features. These new safety components will help warn motorists of a potential crash, or automatically slow down the vehicle. “We’re very hopeful that will continue to be part of a trend,” NHTSA Deputy Administrator Heidi King tells us.

https://www.reyeslaw.com/blog/self-driving-vehicles-eliminate-traffic-fatalities/

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shutterstock_909878241-300x199Statistics show that teens are among the most dangerous drivers. This is not news to any of us. Many teens are just irresponsible, while others simply don’t have the experience necessary to be good drivers. The fact is that drivers between the ages of 16 and 19 are the most dangerous drivers. According to the National Traffic Safety Administration, for each mile driven, teen drivers are approximately four times fore likely to be involved in an accident with another driver. They’re also involved in four times more fatal accidents than drivers between the ages of 25 and 69. Teens account for about ten percent of the population, and twelve percent of all fatal car wrecks.

So given these statistics, the question becomes, “Who is liable for these driving mistakes – the teen, the owner of the vehicle or the teen’s parents?” The following are some situations to consider when answering that question.

A Teen Crashes a Family Vehicle

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bigstock-216694456-1024x647Chevrolet has been sending a safety engineer across the county to raise awareness of the risks of drowsy driving. Fatigued driving accidents are commonplace and particularly dangerous because a sleepy driver is slower to react and brake or swerve to avoid a collision. A drowsy driver may actually nod off behind the wheel and crash at full speed.

Chevrolet is asking local and national journalists to try the car manufacturer’s drowsy driving simulator. It consists of a 23-pound suit to cause the sluggishness your body feels when fatigued, and goggles that replicate frequent blinking associated with drowsy driving.

“As you get tired, the way we can tell is by your percent of eye closure, so every 10 seconds, the goggles close for one second; this represents being a medium level of drowsy, and mimics your eye pattern when you’re tired,” Maureen Short, a human factors expert and senior safety engineer for Chevrolet, told an NBC News reporter. “If you’re truly drowsy and you nod off, it can be 2 to 4 seconds of eye closure at a time.”

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bigstock-Road-accident-Knock-down-pede-55676276-300x190Count Paul Snyder among those who believe distraction, more than vehicles themselves, is responsible for the increase in pedestrian fatalities.

“I think the answer to it is really social patterns, you know, having very little to do with cars,” said Snyder, chair of the transportation design program at Detroit’s College for Creative Studies.

In the search for explanations for a dramatic rise in pedestrian deaths, Snyder is among those who believe that drivers or walkers not paying attention while in traffic, whether it is to glance at smartphones or elsewhere, are to blame. Pedestrian fatalities have risen 46 percent since 2009 while overall traffic deaths are only up 11 percent.

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bigstock-210909490-1024x682All personal injury cases are unique, but they share one factor: The plaintiff must prove the defendant acted negligently, and that this negligence caused a specific injury. This is easier to accomplish in certain cases, such as when an intoxicated driver causes an accident. In other situations, though, proving negligence may require substantial evidence and expert testimony.

What is considered driver negligence?

  1. Distracted driving
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bigstock-Lawyer-Putting-Documents-In-Br-113493107-1024x684Negligence on the road, in the hospital, or in some other setting has caused you undue suffering. You believe that you can secure significant personal injury damages, but before you proceed with your case, you must select a trustworthy attorney.

Personal injury law covers a lot of ground, but as you browse your options, you’ll notice two main patterns:

  • lawyers who advocate a quick solution and settlement above all else
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shutterstock_1245274481-300x200In order to begin to comprehend the issues surrounding distracted driving, it’s important to get a view of the bigger picture. Consider this about texting and driving:

In 2011, 23 percent of all car accidents reported were attributed to the driver using a cell phone in some capacity – talking, texting and driving, browsing, and even playing games – this number has increased to 54 percent in 2017.

Last year, 3,500 people died in car accidents that are attributable to distracted drivers, including texting and driving. This doesn’t necessarily relate to the use of cell phones, but encompasses all driver distractions.

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Distracted Driving Reyes Browne ReilleyEach day in the United States, approximately 9 people are killed and more than 1,000 injured in crashes that are reported to involve distracted driving. Distracted driving killed 3,477 Americans in 2015, and injured 391,000. More than one-fifth, or 21 percent, of all teenagers between the ages of 15 and 19 who were killed in accidents were distracted at the time of the accident.

Many teenagers are in near-constant contact with their friends on phones. But, cellphones and other electronic devices are a leading cause of distraction for drivers today.

Older, more-experienced drivers need to be careful to keep their attention on the road as much as teens. But, young people have less experience driving than most older Americans, and distracted driving can be even more dangerous.

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The Road Movie conveys the swift fickleness of fate, and the powerlessness of people—especially on the road, where danger lurks on every barren stretch of highway, and around every hairpin turn—to protect themselves against unseen calamity. It’s an unforgettable, unshakeable reminder that survival, in general and especially behind the wheel, is often something that’s out of our hands.

The Road Movie by director Dmitrii Kalashnikov is a wild documentary that offers fascinating insight into Russian life through the dashboard camera footage of its many drivers. Kalashnikov created the film solely out of this dashcam footage, which reveals that a great deal of very weird things happen all the time and the surprising number of people who do inexplicable things when they don’t realize that they’re being filmed.

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bigstock-Car-Crash-Irony-4324875-1024x683Though vehicle crash fatality rates have been steadily creeping upward with more cars – and especially trucks – hitting the road in the post-recession years, today’s models aren’t scrimping on the safety features. As many as 10 airbags are spread around a new-vehicle’s cabin these days to provide maximum occupant protection in a collision, with a growing number of cars and trucks now offering advanced safety systems that can help drivers avoid getting into crashes in the first place.

But until perhaps all vehicles on the highway drive themselves, cars will still get into collisions, some due to weather conditions, others because of mechanical issues, but largely because of driver error. And while all vehicles are required to meet a set of complex federal safety standards and most cars get good grades in crash tests, as insurance loss statistics released by the Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI) illustrate, some vehicles inherently protect their occupants better than others in a crash.

https://www.reyeslaw.com/blog/2016/12/cars-talk-to-one-another/

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