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shutterstock_131047082-200x300A new drug is FDA approved and released on the market which is made to solve one medical issue, but also ends up helping in other ways. That’s generally a very good thing. That is, until the marketers get wind of it. One of the most common of these stories is Viagra. Pfizer was working on a drug to help with blood pressure and ended up with the little blue pill that solved men’s bedroom issues. Often these types of incidents end up for the better. However, there are potentially large risks involved when using a drug for something other than its intended use – even when it’s doctor prescribed.

One recent example of off-label drug use is the Low Testosterone therapy (Low T) craze. Low T therapy was first FDA approved as a way to treat men with hypogonadism, which affects the hormones developed in male genitalia. It didn’t take long for the pharmaceutical industry to figure out how to market “Low T” to every man over 40 who was grouchy or had lost a step to their 25 year old self. The resulting boom in the Low T industry (nearly $2B a year!) is now thought by many to be responsible for an increase of men experiencing heart attacks, strokes, and other circulatory problems as their slightly-worn ‘engines’ try to cope with an increased red blood cell count and thicker viscosity blood (known as polycythemia).

Off-label drug use is increasing, leading to more and more complications with prescription drug users. Off-label drug use means a medication is being used for something other than its originally intended purpose, as specified by the FDA. The sole purpose of the Food and Drug Administration is to regulate drug approval and make sure every drug is safe for people to use. However, the FDA has little say over how doctors actually prescribe the drugs.

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PHILADELPHIA –A Southwest Airlines jet reportedly blew an engine at about 30,000 feet, producing shrapnel that broke a window and damaged the fuselage Tuesday. The NTSB confirmed one person has died after the emergency landing of a Southwest Airlines plane at Philadelphia International Airport on Tuesday.

“We do have information there was one fatality,” NTSB Chairman Robert Sumwalt said. No further details were provided.

Another 12 people were assessed by medics, officials reported, and seven of those people were treated for minor injuries.

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bigstock-210909490-1024x682All personal injury cases are unique, but they share one factor: The plaintiff must prove the defendant acted negligently, and that this negligence caused a specific injury. This is easier to accomplish in certain cases, such as when an intoxicated driver causes an accident. In other situations, though, proving negligence may require substantial evidence and expert testimony.

What is considered driver negligence?

  1. Distracted driving
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https://www.reyeslaw.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/http_2F2Fo.aolcdn.com2Fhss2Fstorage2Fmidas2Fc7bf479e5bc11a2600c8ba290af3c3852F2043830562FRTS4S6Q-1024x672.jpgNEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. — Johnson & Johnson and its talc supplier have been hit with a $37 million verdict in compensatory damages over claims that a New Jersey man contracted a deadly form of cancer from using the healthcare giant’s talc powder products that contained asbestos.

A jury in Middlesex County Superior court found New Brunswick-based J&J responsible for 70% of the damages in a Thursday decision after more than two months of trial. The panel found Imerys SA, the company’s the France-based talc supplier, responsible for the remaining 30% of damages.

Stephen Lanzo, now in his mid-40s, said he was exposed to asbestos by inhaling dust from J&J baby powder from approximately 1972 to roughly 2003, according to the court complaint in the civil case. He was diagnosed in 2016 with mesothelioma, an aggressive form of cancer that develops in the lining of the lungs, abdomen, or heart as the result of asbestos fibers.

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Sixteen people are being treated for injuries when a bus crashed on its way to the Masters Tournament at Augusta National on Thursday morning, according to WRDW and the Georgia State Patrol.

A tour bus heading from Atlanta to Augusta carrying 18 people overturned around 8:45 a.m. on the eastbound side of I-20. The bus, carrying 18 people, went off the right side of the road before going off the left side of the road and flipping over in the median.

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bigstock-Lawyer-Putting-Documents-In-Br-113493107-1024x684Negligence on the road, in the hospital, or in some other setting has caused you undue suffering. You believe that you can secure significant personal injury damages, but before you proceed with your case, you must select a trustworthy attorney.

Personal injury law covers a lot of ground, but as you browse your options, you’ll notice two main patterns:

  • lawyers who advocate a quick solution and settlement above all else
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car-wreck-dangers-dallas-300x200A car accident is a traumatizing experience that can lead to serious injuries and well as long-term emotional troubles. Here are six things that might shock you about car accidents.

1. Thirty-One Percent of Fatal Accidents Involve Alcohol

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), in 2017, 31 percent of all traffic-related fatalities in the U.S. involved an alcohol-impaired driver. There were 10,322 fatalities in the U.S. that involved a driver with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 or higher.

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S088038436-860x553One of the most important elements of your vehicle–the steering wheel–should at no time come loose and/or fall off.

Ford Motors recently attracted national attention for exactly that problem.

On March 14 Ford Motor Company issued a North American recall for almost 1.4 million Fusion and Lincoln MKZ model sedans after getting reports that loose bolts were causing some vehicles’ steering wheels to detach.

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https://www.reyeslaw.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/https_2F2Fblogs-images.forbes.com2Fjimmcpherson2Ffiles2F20182F032FAP_18078661760690.jpgOn Sunday night, a self-driving car operated by Uber struck and killed a pedestrian, 49-year-old Elaine Herzberg, on North Mill Avenue in Tempe, Arizona. It appears to be the first time a self-driving car has killed a human being by force of impact. The car was traveling at 38 miles per hour.

An initial investigation by Tempe police indicated that the pedestrian might have been at fault. According to that report, Herzberg appears to have come “from the shadows,” stepping off the median into the roadway, and ending up in the path of the car while jaywalking across the street. The National Transportation Safety Board has also opened an investigation.

Likewise, it’s difficult to evaluate what this accident means for the future of autonomous cars. Crashes, injuries, and fatalities were a certainty as driverless vehicles began moving from experiment to reality.

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bigstock-183366073-1024x683When a driver is involved in car accidents, after seeking any necessary medical attention, it is natural to start thinking about the costs that are going to be associated with the accident if there are any injuries or property damage involved. When the negligent driver involved is driving a company car, it is possible the driver’s employer may be responsible for the driver’s actions.

Under the tort doctrine of respondeat superior, an employer is responsible for the actions of an employee that are done in the performance of the employee’s employment duties. This means that if an employee is driving a company car, and is negligent in its operation thereby causing an accident, the employer is considered equally liable, and can be sued to seek compensation for injuries sustained in car accidents.

When determining whether or not an employer is liable for the employee’s actions, a judge or jury looks to whether the employee was within the scope of his or her employment duties, or if the employee was performing a special errand for the employer when the accident occurred. Just because an employee is driving a company car does not mean employer liability is automatic. If the employee was supposed to be driving to a specific place and instructed to return to headquarters, but instead deviated in the opposite direction at which point the accident happened, the employer might not be found liable. If the employer is not receiving a benefit from the trip, it is not likely that liability will be shifted to the employer. Additionally, if an employee is on the way to or from work, or on a lunch break, the employer is not likely to be liable under respondeat superior.

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