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Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death and serious injury for children over one years of age, and every day an unrestrained child under the age of five is killed in a traffic crash in the United States.

The safest place for a child in a car is in a rear seat, properly buckled into a child safety seat, or a booster seat – but what type of Child Car Safety Seat should you be using?

If your child is:

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Deadly Dentistry - Part 6 - Could Dental Malpractice be Considered Murder?

A California dentist, Dr. Claire, was charged with second-degree murder in the death of his son, after performing a routine dental procedure. Patrick Claire, a developmentally disabled 36-year-old whose condition resembled autism, died shortly after having a painful wisdom tooth extracted by his father. Patrick died from respiratory failure and cardiac arrest as a result of an overdose of the sedatives morphine and valium. The dentist had been practicing for forty years and had a history of complaints filed against him for sedation-related issues. Morphine is not an approved sedative and Dr. Claire did not have a license to practice aesthetics.

What elevated the incident of death from dental malpractice to suspicion of murder was the testimony of an eyewitness to the entire procedure. Sandra Montoya was the dental assistant at the time and claimed that Dr. Claire did nothing when she tried to alert him that his son was struggling to breathe. She said that the doctor claimed that such was common and his son was prone to having seizures. After Ms. Montoya left work at 5:00 pm the doctor waited an hour and called 911. When police and rescue workers arrived around 6:00 pm they found Dr. Claire half-heartedly administering CPR to his son with a force the equivalent of “honking a car horn with one hand”. Patrick was taken to a local hospital where he was declared dead. Montoya told police that she did not see the doctor administer the required blood pressure tests to Patrick prior to giving him the sedatives and that there were no vital signs monitored during the procedure as required by law.

Although Dr. Claire claimed that he had given Patrick a standard intravenous dosage of valium and morphine, lethal amounts nearly three times the required level to sedate a patient of his height and weight were found in his system including some in his stomach. It was discovered that Patrick had sought medical attention at the local emergency room and was given pain prescription painkillers including novocaine. It is suspected that Patrick, a known local drug user, could have secured the morphine illegally and used it to relieve his pain without telling his father.

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A school bus carrying fifth graders on a field trip was ripped apart as it collided with a dump truck on a New Jersey interstate highway Thursday morning, according to New Jersey State Police.

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Multiple people were killed, The Associated Press and local outlets reported, citing the Morris County prosecutor’s office.

People involved in the accident on Route 80 were taken to at least three area hospitals.
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bigstock-Vaping-Man-Holding-A-Mod-A-Cl-227600464-1024x683A former CNBC producer was killed when his vape exploded and lodged in his skull, according to an autopsy confirmed by the medical examiner of Pinellas County.

Tallmadge Wakeman D’Elia, 38, who went by “Wake,” died on Cinco de Mayo in St. Petersburg, FL after his vape pen ignited a fire in his bedroom. The autopsy results  reportedly showed the vape not only exploded and sparked the blaze, but it made a “projectile wound” in D’Elia’s skull.

Bill Pellan, Director of Investigations at the Pinellas County Medical Examiner’s Office confirmed the report.

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Benny S. of Dallas, Texas, shares his Reyes Browne Reilley experience and level of satisfaction with our staff and customer service while helping him recover from damages stemming from a car wreck in Dallas.

“Yes. My name is Benny S. I was involved in a car wreck where I got hit from behind from another driver. And the other driver was their fault. And that same night, I call the lawyer [Reyes Browne Reilley]. My case worker was Brittany. And she took over and put me in therapy, and everything came out to be real nice. And the money-wise, the settlement was very nice. So I’m very satisfied. Thank you.”

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bigstock-Garbage-truck-5991610-1024x680The next time you take your garbage can to the street, you might take a moment to consider risks sanitation workers face each day.

A recent New York Times article shed light on the dangers that sanitation workers face in their daily duties. The terrible death endured by the man in the article is more common than you might think.

Waste workers have been facing on-the-job dangers across the country for decades. In fact, the hazards of this essential work was the inspiration for a waste worker strike in 1968 in Memphis. That walkout was sparked by the deaths of two sanitation workers, Echol Cole and Robert Walker. Both men were crushed by the hydraulic press of their garbage truck.

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Angel Reyes Blog - Did the Hospital Kill Her Mom?
Because of the routine simplicity of administering medical procedures, like setting a broken bone or having minor surgery, doctors are seemingly confounded when things go wrong and a patient dies. Their reaction can be to blame a rare syndrome or condition as the cause of the death, one that they have never seen before, and that they were caught by surprise. They may claim that there was nothing that could have been done to prevent the patient’s death. More often than not, however, the rare syndrome diagnosis is just a cover for medical malpractice and doctor and hospital negligence.

A recent story written by a hospital patient advocacy group, ProPublica for the website thedailybeast.com, tells the story of women who was admitted to a hospital for the treatment of minor seizures and was simply to be given medication, held for observation and released. What was to be a routine treatment turned out to trigger a series of events that caused her death. And the upshot is that neither the doctors or the hospital have ever been held accountable for their negligence.

ProPublica, through a questionnaire sent to the survivors of people who have died due to likely hospital malpractice, found that the woman somehow fell out of her hospital bed and broke both her hip and her wrist. It’s not a stretch to see how a person suffering from seizures could fall and hurt themselves if not properly medicated and supervised. The bone breaks were not diagnosed or treated for days and when they finally were an expensive hip replacement was performed. The hip replacement surgery caused a severe infection. All this time the patient was being given an improper IV for her seizures that caused her to seek medical treatment in the first place and she suffered severe swelling in her arm, neck and face. When the patient died, the hospital claimed that the cause of death was a rare disease that was caused by the IV drip and that they had never seen it before.

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bigstock-Car-Crash-6699116-1024x683Today, driving is arguably safer than it has ever been before with decreased car crashes.

Modern vehicles now boast a number of safety features, including blind spot monitoring, driver alertness detection systems and emergency braking. Additionally, highway engineering has improved over the last several decades. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention called motor vehicle safety one of the top 10 U.S. public health achievements of the 20th century.

Despite this, there were 32,166 crashes that led to at least one death in the U.S. in 2015.

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car-safety-gear-cuts-deaths-in-dallas-300x200Driving regulations, such as no texting and driving, are good measures to ensure drivers are safer on the road, but are not the only actions in place to keep roads safer. A new study shows that safety gear and equipment being installed in new model cars has proven to decrease the amount of deaths resulting from auto accidents.

According to the Wall Street Journal, federal data released by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in December 2017 shows that safety features being built into cars in recent years have allowed for a drop in auto fatalities. In the study, it shows that in the past decade the number of fatalities from accidents has dropped by nearly two-thirds with each new model car released. In 2016, the number of fatalities dropped by 3.1% over the previous year, while the number of those injured fell 2.1%.

Traction And Stability Systems Lead To Safer Vehicles

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bigstock-Hispanic-worker-falling-from-l-149757296-1024x683In 2017 more than 6,400 American workers suffered fatal injuries. Of these incidents, Latinos made up 19 percent of all fatal occupational injuries in the United States. While there are inherent risks on construction and extraction sites, Latino workers also face a bigger dilemma because they’re not fully aware of the rights and resources afforded to them through the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and workers’ compensation, respectively.

Work Safety: An Uphill Battle for Latino Workers

According to a recent analysis by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Latino workers over-populate some of the country’s most dangerous industries. In fact, nearly one in three workers in the construction and natural resource extraction industries is Latino. This is a 23.7 percent increase since 2015.

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